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2019-20 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Aug 20, 2019  
2019-20 Undergraduate Catalog

Undergraduate Curriculum



Arcadia’s Undergraduate Curriculum provides a distinctively global, integrative and personal learning experience that prepares you to contribute and prosper in a diverse and dynamic world. The Undergraduate Curriculum is designed to ensure that all Arcadia students:

Explore the Globe.

Experience other cultures in addition to reading about them. Arcadia provides you the opportunities to study around the world, the nation, and the region. You go where you want to go.

Design Your Own Path.

Arcadia’s flexible curriculum allows you and your adviser to design an academic path specially tailored to your interests and enthusiasms.

Make Intellectual Connections.

At Arcadia, your courses and academic experiences make the connections—across disciplines and cultures, between theory and practical applications, between the classroom and the community—that help you understand how the world works.

Develop an Expertise.

Choose a major from over 45 fields of study and work with Arcadia’s acclaimed teaching faculty to become an expert in your field.

Undergraduate Curriculum Requirements for First-Year Students

To graduate from Arcadia University, undergraduates who enter as traditional first-year students must do three things:

  1. Complete a total of 128 credits.
  2. Complete the requirements of their chosen major.
  3. Complete the Undergraduate Curriculum Requirements as follows:

(Note: Undergraduate Curriculum requirements are defined by courses rather than credits. Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of courses.)

Integrative Learning Experiences

  • First-Year Seminar/Learning Community – Usually taken during the first semester. In most cases, if a student does not successfully complete the First-Year Seminar, a third Integrative Learning Experience will be required.
  • Global Connections Experience and Reflection – Participate in this Global Connections Experience and a simultaneous Global Connections Reflection at any point during your Arcadia career. A Global Connections Experience is a sustained, semester-long, cross-cultural experience. Typical ways of fulfilling the Global Connections Experience include: study abroad; taking a Global Connections Experience-designated course in Glenside; study away at a pre-approved domestic exchange institution.
  • Two additional Integrative Learning Experiences – These two Integrative Learning Experiences are in addition to the First-Year Seminar and Global Connections Experience. Typical ways of fulfilling this requirement include: taking University Seminars (All University Seminars carry the Integrative Learning designation.); participating in additional Global Connections Experiences beyond the required one; completing 4-credit GFS travel courses (note that a GFS course cannot meet both the IL and GE/GR designations).
  • Senior Capstone Project – Complete this project in the final year as a part of the chosen major.

Areas of Inquiry

Students take courses that allow them to explore these four theme-based Areas of Inquiry:

  • Creative Expressions (1)
  • Cultural Legacies (2)
  • Natural and Physical World (2, at least 1 of which must have a laboratory component)
  • Self and Society (2)

Intellectual Practices

Students sometimes develop Intellectual Practices in standalone courses dedicated solely to these practices. More often they are developed in courses throughout the University that concentrate on the given Intellectual Practice in the context of other subject matter.

  • Crossing Boundaries (2) – Take two Crossing Boundaries-designated courses from those offered in various departments. Students may not fulfill both of their Crossing Boundaries requirements while off campus for a study abroad or study away semester.
  • Modern Language – Complete the introductory (102) level of a modern language. Students who place into the 200 level (or above) of a language are waived from the Modern Language requirement.
  • Quantitative Reasoning (2) – Take one Mathematics course beyond MA 100  and also take one additional Quantitative Reasoning-designated course from those offered in various departments or a second Mathematics course beyond MA 100 .
  • Visual Literacy (1) – Take one Visual Literacy-designated course from those offered in various departments.
  • Writing (4) – Complete EN 101 Thought and Expression I  in the first year and complete a Research Writing-designated (RW) course by the end of the second year from those offered either in the major or the English Department. In addition, complete two additional Writing-designated (W) courses from those offered in various departments. Many capstone courses carry the W designation.

Students entering Arcadia University in the following programs who remain in good academic standing in these programs shall satisfy the Undergraduate Curriculum requirements of the 57+ Credits Transfer Student Category plus one First-Year Seminar:

  • Engineering 3+2 with University of Pittsburgh and the Washington University.
  • Pre-Optometry 3+4 with Salus University
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts / Art Education (BFA with a concentration and certification in Art Education from Arcadia)

Should an Engineering 3+2 or Pre-Optometry 3+4 student be withdrawn from their accelerated program for whatever reason such that the student is completing all 128 undergraduate credits at Arcadia, then the student will be required to fulfill all Undergraduate Curriculum requirements as if the student entered as a typical First Year student. Similarly, should a BFA with a concentration and certification in Art Education switch out of the program then the student will be required to fulfill all Undergraduate Curriculum requirements as if the student entered as a typical First Year student.

Undergraduate Curriculum Requirements for Transfer Students

To graduate from Arcadia University, undergraduates who enter as transfer students must do three things:

  1. Complete a total of 128 credits.
  2. Complete the requirements of their chosen major.
  3. Complete the Undergraduate Curriculum Requirements for transfer students, which depend upon the number of credits initially transferred. As follows: All students must complete EN 101  if they do not have an equivalent course with a “B” or better.

(Note: Undergraduate Curriculum requirements are defined by courses rather than credits. Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of courses.)

For Transfer Students who entered beginning Fall 2013 with:

18 credits or fewer (not including AP exam credits and dual enrollment college credits):

  • Treated as First-Year Students. Need to complete all Integrative Learning Experiences, Areas of Inquiry, and Intellectual Practices.

More than 18 and fewer than 57 credits:

  • 1 Global Connections Experience & Reflection
  • 2 additional Integrative Learning requirements
  • 1 Senior Capstone
  • Areas of Inquiry – 1 of each
  • Creative Expression
  • Cultural Legacies
  • Self & Society
  • Natural & Physical World with lab
  • Intellectual Practices
  • Completion of the 102-level of a Modern Language
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning Mathematics (Math beyond MA 100 )
  • 2 Writing-designated courses

57 or more credits:

  • 1 Global Connections Experience & Reflection
  • 1 additional Integrative Learning requirement
  • 1 Senior Capstone
  • Areas of Inquiry – 1 of each
  • Creative Expressions
  • Cultural Legacies
  • Self & Society
  • Natural & Physical World with lab
  • Intellectual Practices
  • 1 Quantitative Reasoning Mathematics (Math beyond 100)
  • 1 Writing-designated course

Core-to-Core transfer students:

  • 1 Global Connections Experience & Reflection
  • 1 Senior Capstone

For Transfer Students who entered prior to Fall 2013 with:

Fewer Than 15 Credits

Same as first-year students. Need to complete all Curricular Experiences, Areas of Inquiry and Intellectual Practices.

More than 16 and fewer than 45 Credits

  • University Seminars (2) – Take two University Seminars after the completion of the First-Year Seminar and before Senior Capstone.
  • Global Connections Experience and Reflection – Participate in this experience and at the same time in a reflection at any point in your Arcadia career.
  • Senior Capstone Project – Complete this project in final year as a part of your chosen major.

46 or More Credits

  • University Seminars (1) – Take one University Seminar after the completion of the First-Year Seminar and before Senior Capstone.
  • Global Connections Experience and Reflection – Participate in this experience and at the same time in a separate reflection at any point in your Arcadia career.
  • Senior Capstone Project – Complete this project in the final year as a part of your chosen major.

Core-to-Core Transfer

  • Global Connections Experience and Reflection – Participate in this experience and at the same time in a separate reflection at any point in your Arcadia career.
  • Senior Capstone Project – Complete this project in the final year as a part of your chosen major.

How the Undergraduate Curriculum Works

Most Arcadia Undergraduate Curriculum requirements focus on educational ends rather than particular means to those ends (e.g., specific courses). As a result, students have significant flexibility in determining how and with what courses these requirements may be satisfied. Some courses students complete within their chosen majors also will satisfy Undergraduate Curriculum requirements. In addition, courses taken within one’s major and elsewhere throughout the University may, when appropriate, fulfill multiple Undergraduate Curriculum requirements simultaneously.

Undergraduate Curriculum Requirements and Students’ Chosen Majors

Students’ chosen majors are their primary pathways through the rest of Arcadia’s Undergraduate Curriculum since courses taken to fulfill a chosen major also fulfill some of the required Integrative Learning Experiences, Areas of Inquiry, and Intellectual Practices. However, which Undergraduate Curriculum requirements are fulfilled by major courses differs by major. Therefore, each student works with his or her academic adviser – who is a faculty member from the student’s major department – to determine which Undergraduate Curriculum requirements the student will fulfill in major courses and which requirements he or she will fulfill in courses outside the major.

How Courses Can Fulfill Multiple Undergraduate Curriculum Requirements

Courses both within and outside students’ chosen majors sometimes fulfill multiple Undergraduate Curriculum requirements simultaneously. For example, it is fairly common for courses around the University to satisfy both an Area of Inquiry and an Intellectual Practice. Similarly, the First-Year Seminars (which is a required Integrative Learning Experience) also satisfy at least one Area of Inquiry. Similarly, all University Seminars (which all satisfy one of the required additional Integrative Learning Experiences) also satisfy at least one Area of Inquiry and at least one Intellectual Practice.

Understanding Courses and Credits

Undergraduates need a total of 128 credits to graduate from Arcadia University – the equivalent of eight semesters of 16 credits each. However, Undergraduate Curriculum requirements are defined by courses rather than credits. Most courses that fulfill Undergraduate Curriculum requirements carry 4 credits. For example, most courses that fulfill an Area of Inquiry or Intellectual Practice requirement carry 4 credits. However, there are some exceptions. The Global Connections Experience is often fulfilled through a semester abroad or through a semester-long domestic exchange with a partner university. When done away from campus (either internationally or domestically), the “experience” is connected to the semester as a whole that one is away from campus, rather than connected to a specific course. The Global Connections Reflection is often fulfilled by completing a specific 2-credit Reflection course during one’s Global Connections Experience. In addition, 3-credit courses also sometimes may fulfill Undergraduate Curriculum requirements when appropriate.

Courses Taken at Other Institutions

Students also can fulfill curricular requirements through courses taken through study abroad/study away, Advanced Placement, college courses completed during high school, International Baccalaureate or summer courses at other institutions. These courses carry the same designations as their equivalents within the Arcadia University system when available. If not available, students may petition to have a course count for a particular designation.

Additional Information on Components of the Undergraduate Curriculum

Integrative Learning Experiences

Arcadia’s Undergraduate Curriculum provides an integrative and global experience for all Arcadia University undergraduate students throughout their academic careers. All students participate in three types of required Curricular Experiences – First-Year Experience; Global Connections Experience and Reflection; Senior Capstone Project. In addition, most students take one or more University Seminars, which count toward the additional Integrative Learning requirements.

First-Year Experience

The First-Year Experience begins at Orientation in late August. Fellow students, faculty and staff help you to get comfortably settled in on campus. Here you begin learning about the academic, co-curricular and personal opportunities available to you at Arcadia. And you are provided all the information, support, and resources needed to make a successful transition to college life.

The academic core of the First-Year Experience revolves around the First-Year Seminar—a small, interactive class where you explore special topics that interest you. Choose from dozens of different First-Year Seminars, all of them—along with a required first-semester Thought and Expression writing course—designed to spark intellectual curiosity and to begin developing the academic tools and habits you need to thrive in the Arcadia classroom.

That first semester you also participate in a Learning Community with the instructor and the other students in your First-Year Seminar. Together you take advantage of academic and cultural opportunities on Arcadia’s campus and around the Philadelphia metropolitan area. In your Learning Community, you make friends with fellow first-year students who share your interests and you learn about and contribute to the wider Arcadia community.

In the spring semester, most first-year students travel during spring break in March with Arcadia faculty and staff mentors to one of more than a dozen international sites for Spring Preview. The Spring Preview trip is part of a 2-credit course in which students get academic grounding in the place and thematic subject of the course in Glenside in addition to the one-week travel component. Spring Preview is open to any first-year student who enters the University with fewer than 32 credits. In order to participate in Spring previews students must earn a minimum of 1.75 GPA during the fall semester and may not be on academic or disciplinary probation.

Global Connections Experience and Reflection

The Global Connections Experience and Reflection provide all Arcadia students the opportunity to explore new places and cultures. In a sustained cross-cultural experience, you meet people and learn about a society different from that in which you have lived previously. In addition, during your Global Connections Experience you participate in a supervised reflection—typically by compiling an electronic portfolio—in which you document and analyze your experiences.

Where you go for your Global Connections Experience is up to you.

You might choose to go to a foreign country. Every major provides a pathway to study abroad that suggest places and times in which foreign travel particularly enhances your academic development, and Arcadia’s College of Global Studies puts 122 programs in 22 countries on six continents around the world easily at your fingertips. Arcadia students often study abroad for a semester, but others study abroad for an for a summer or for an entire year.

Your Global Connections Experience also might occur in the United States. Domestic study away programs offer the opportunity to spend a semester at universities such as Whittier College in Los Angeles, Butler University outside of Indianapolis, Drury University in Missouri, North Central College in Chicago, and Wagner College in New York City.

Many students also fulfill their Global Connections Experience by taking a Global Connections Experience-designated course in Glenside. A variety of Arcadia courses that engage in extensive service learning as well as other local experiences, such as student teaching and internships, also carry the Global Connections designation when they occur in approved cross-cultural settings. It is also possible to design an individualized Global Connections Experience in consultation with the Director of Global Connections.

Students complete the Global Connections Reflection simultaneously to the Global Connections Experience. When students are completing their Global Connections Experience away from Glenside they typically take a 2-credit online course (GCR 101 ) that assists students in reflecting on the interconnections, interdependence, and inequality they encounter during the experience. When students are completing their Global Connections Experience as part of a Glenside-based course, the Global Connections Reflection is usually embedded within that course.

University Seminars

University Seminars are a showcase of integrative learning at Arcadia, designed to make intellectual connections among academic disciplines and between scholarly ideas and the world beyond the classroom. A wide range of University Seminars are offered each semester, and all University Seminars count toward the additional Integrative Learning requirements.

Many University Seminars are interdisciplinary courses where your Arcadia professors explore a dynamic world of ideas with you. University Seminars also take you out of the classroom and into the culturally and intellectually rich Philadelphia region. Taking University Seminars also helps you to work toward fulfilling other Arcadia Undergraduate Curriculum requirements. All University Seminars fulfill at least one Area of Inquiry and at least one Intellectual Practice.

Senior Capstone Project

The Senior Capstone Project is the opportunity for you to bring four years of coursework and academic and personal experiences together by engaging in an extended project in your major. What you do for your Senior Capstone Project depends on both your chosen field of study and your own personal interests. Each major department designs the parameters of the project to help you develop an expertise and synthesize the learning you’ve done at Arcadia. And you select the focus of your research, scholarly or creative activities. Then when you’ve completed your Senior Capstone Project at the conclusion of your final year, you tell the world about your work during our campus-wide celebration of senior projects. Faculty members, family, and friends come out to learn about and enjoy the product of your academic labors. Art and Design majors host an exciting group exhibit. Majors in some departments give oral presentations describing their research and engage in lively discussion sessions. And those in other departments create visual displays of their work for interactive public poster fairs.

Areas of Inquiry

Arcadia students take courses exploring four theme-based Areas of Inquiry that ensure you develop a broad, well-rounded education. Most courses at Arcadia satisfy one Area of Inquiry requirement. Some interdisciplinary First-Year Seminars and University Seminars satisfy more than one. The four Areas of Inquiry are Creative Expressions, Cultural Legacies, Natural and Physical World, and Self and Society.

Creative Expressions

Students participate in the creative process through the expression and application of their original ideas and imagination. These project-based courses—typically in the fields of fine arts, performing arts, and creative writing—explore and develop ideas by means of production, review, revision and presentation.

Cultural Legacies

Students study human experience and expression through the exploration of the history and interpretation of past cultures and cultural texts. By examining aspects of past cultures such as their politics, religions, ethical systems, and literary and artistic production, students engage in asking and answering questions about understanding the past.

Natural and Physical World

Students learn about and participate in answering questions about the natural and physical world. This includes applying observation and experimentation based on physical events that are predictable and quantifiable. These courses explore both the process and outcome of scientific inquiries.

Self and Society

Students explore the multiple forces that create, shape and sustain the development of self-identity, and they examine how individuals and groups live together, form societies, and distribute resources and power. Students focus on understanding the mechanisms and processes that shape who we are and what we can become and analyze how and why societies and social institutions function, evolve, and include and exclude.

Intellectual Practices

Arcadia students develop five Intellectual Practices that provide the tools to understand, interpret and communicate in a complex, global society. Intellectual Practices are sometimes developed in stand-alone courses dedicated solely to these practices. But more often they are developed in courses throughout the University—some in your major, others outside of it—that concentrate on the given Intellectual Practice in the context of other subject matter. The five Intellectual Practices are Crossing Boundaries, Modern Languages, Quantitative Reasoning, Visual Literacy and Writing.

Crossing Boundaries

Students examine issues related to interconnectedness, interdependence, and inequity within and among nation-states of the world. Crossing Boundaries-designated courses also explore issues of social justice, social welfare, and economic rights across national and social boundaries.

Modern Languages

Students complete the introductory level of a language other than English, which may require up to two courses depending on your prior experience.

Quantitative Reasoning

Students develop the ability to ask and act on questions related to the analysis of data, the application of mathematical models, or the cultural and political roles of mathematical thinking.

Visual Literacy

Students focus on the viewing and interpretation of visual information and images from a variety of sources as well as the expression of meaning through visual means.

Writing

By emphasizing how expression enhances learning, understanding, and communication, students focus on the craft and process of written presentation through revisions based on critical commentary.

Global Connections, Experience, Reflection

There are many ways to fulfill the Global Connections Experience – as close by as the Won Buddhist Temple in Glenside or as far away as Capetown, South Africa. In each case, students are engaged in a sustained, semester-long cross-cultural experience and are involved in ongoing reflection during the experience (typically through enrolling in GCR 101 ).

Although many students fulfill the Global Connections Experience by studying abroad, there are several domestic exchange options that also fulfill this requirement: For each of the exchange options listed below, students continue to pay Arcadia tuition and fees during the semester they are away rather than paying the institution they are visiting.

Whittier College Exchange

Spend a semester outside Los Angeles exploring this multicultural and multilingual campus and community (Fall and Spring)

Butler University Exchange

Participate in the Center for Urban Ecology, learning about local/global sustainability issues as part of the NACU Consortium. Located a mere 5 miles from downtown Indianapolis, Butler offers a residential campus in the midst of the 14th largest city in the United States.

Drury University Exchange

Experience Drury’s unique location, cosmopolitan but nestled in and tied by their mission to the natural beauty of the Missouri Ozarks. As part of the NACU Consortium, have a unequalled living/learning experience if you are interested in environmental sciences and advocacy by participating in the Ozarks Center for Sustainable Solutions, a home for applied environmental research and policy

North Central College Exchange

Participate in a Chicago Term, exploring the social, historical and cultural dimensions of this great American city as part of the NACU consortium (Fall only).

Wagner College Exchange

Participate in a New York Semester, exploring the social, historical, and cultural dimensions of this great American city as part of the NACU consortium. (Spring only)

The Washington Semester

Participate in a Washington, DC Semester. The Washington semester emphasizes the integration of academic and experiential learning and civic engagement as part of the NACU Consortium. This program is administered by the Arcadia University Political Sciences Department.

In addition to these domestic exchange possibilities, students can participate in Glenside-based courses that have an experiential component in order to fulfill the Global Connections Experience. If a student participates in a course-based experience, he or she are is expected to complete 15 additional experiential hours either in the same community as the course-based experience or in a context or organization that addresses the same issue or topic the student is exploring. Listed below are some courses that fulfill this requirement; students should check course availability each semester:

International Students

  • Eligible international students can meet the GE/GR requirements by enrolling in GCR101 and using their student status alone as the Global Experience (GE) only within the first two semesters as an Arcadia student. This period will also coincide with the first two semesters during which the students is a first time resident in the United States.
  • Eligible international students who have been in the United States for more than one academic year (and do not choose to study abroad further while at Arcadia) must either take a course on the Glenside campus with a GE/GR designation or propose a local global experience project and enroll in GCR101 (concurrent to the project). This aligns with the current policy for U.S born student residents not studying abroad.

Individualized Experience

It is also possible to design an individualized Global Connections Experience in consultation with the Director of Global Learning, but this should be a last resort. The University is in the process of designing opportunities that combine short-term study away with a local or online sustained experience.